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Communications In the Cloud Blog

Cloud Computing: Where It Came from and Where It’s Going

June 15, 2015
Cloud Computing

When it comes to modern computing, details like the location of devices and physical
components, like servers, aren’t much of a concern for average users. Offices once needed stacks
of onsite servers to handle data. Today, this equipment is commonly managed remotely, and
users manage information via the Cloud. But, where did this idea come from? And what can we
expect in the future?

Psychedelic Roots

Early ideas of modern Cloud computing date back to the 1950s. Visionaries of the time imagined
a level of accessibility that would allow data to be shared anywhere, any time. Others imagined a
public service that would connect people and ideas together effortlessly.

Taking Flight

Of course, the modern convenience of Cloud computing took a while to get going. From its
ideation, the concept of Cloud computing slowly became less sci-fi and more feasible. What
started out as central computer hubs and dedicated virtual machines become more efficient and
affordable.

 

Through the late 20th century, the technology became more efficient, smaller, and most
importantly, data managers remotely operate the infrastructure supporting it. Once, businesses
needed machines that took up entire rooms, and then businesses ran onsite servers that
employees connected to from their desks.

 

By the 1990s, internet technology gained serious traction. Broadband connections became more
reliable, and telecommunications companies could make the switch from dedicated data circuits
to virtual private network services. This drastically reduced the cost of service and resulted in
even better bandwidth capabilities.

 

This level of efficiency paved the way for continued interest in Cloud computing. In 1999,
Salesforce.com emerged as a leading example of how effective enterprise-level applications
delivered over the internet could be. Any consumer with internet access could use its application,
and companies could subscribe to use the service. Amazon continued this trend in 2002 as the
first major retailer to revolutionize its data centers by taking its computing infrastructure to the
Cloud.

Web 2.0 and Beyond

Deemed Web 2.0, the second iteration of the World Wide Web popularized the idea of global
collaboration on the internet. Companies continued to take their business to the Cloud to
optimize data and overhead costs, but more tools were developed for individuals to create and
share new content.

This focus on applications opened up communication between users and made the web more
accessible individually. Today, even the most average internet user with an email account has
information stored over the Cloud, and the learning curve for creating and sharing data is as
simple as operating MS Office.

 

This trend toward usability and resourcefulness will likely endure as Cloud technology continues
to grow. Businesses looking to transition to the Cloud, or that want to find out more about its
advantages, have the benefit of partnering with a team that can handle all the infrastructure and
installation for them. For a better look at these systems, try a free consultation with S-Net to see
what moving to the Cloud will look like for your enterprise.

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